Tag Archives: Carrera

First Look: Porsche 911 (991) Carrera S

22 Feb

The New Porsche 911 (991) Carrera S

Changing something that works isn’t easy. Case in point, the Porsche 911. Roughly every seven years Porsche’s iconic nameplate gets reincarnated, becoming more modern, powerful and efficient with each redesign.  Now in its seventh generation, the two-door sports car has come to symbolize the very essence of what the brand stands for. It’s not just a Porsche, it’s the Porsche.

With the latest 911, the 991, beginning to arrive in showrooms around the U.S., I wanted to get an in-person look at the new Carrera S to see if the changes to the exterior and interior resulted in success or failure.

When compared to its predecessor, the 997, the 991 is .20 inches shorter in overall height, .98 inches longer and has a wider track than the previous generation. Those figures might seem unsubstantial, and they are, especially when the wheelbase has grown by 3.90 inches. The expanded wheelbase is immediately noticeable, giving the car a lower, sleeker stance. A longer car might seem like a waste of raw materials to many people, but it’s actually a good thing. Increasing the wheelbase enables the 991 to have a lower center of gravity, this in-turn, gives the vehicle better stability and control at high speeds. And with a top speed of 188 miles per hour, or 187 miles per hour with the brands seven-speed Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) transmission, you’ll be thanking the engineers for the improvement.

The New Porsche 911 (991) Carrera S

Other prominent exterior changes include the rear taillights, which has a thinner and more blade-like design, and the rear spoiler is has been created to blend cleanly into the rear when not in use. The headlights and taillights have been pushed to the very edges, giving both ends of the vehicle an even wider appearance. As with the spoiler, the sunroof features a new design as well. Instead of sliding into a portion of the roof itself, the glass slides outside the car. When fully retracted the sunroof keeps the streamlined styling intact while maintaining maximum interior headroom

Interior of the new Porsche 911 (991)

The interior has changed just as much as the exterior. But once again, Porsche has been careful to preserve the overall feel and appearance, consistent with all 911 models. Upon entering the passenger cabin the center console instantly grabs your attention. With a sloped figure that leads up to the bottom of the center dash it strongly resembles the center console in the four-door Panamera. Within the center are a number of controls, all clustered together below the PDK gear selector. Of the two 991 Carrera S’ in attendance both were equipped with the aforementioned PDK, not the seven-speed manual I was hoping for.

Besides the center console much of the interior has stayed true to form. The familiar five-gauge instrument cluster allows the driver to keep track of engine speed, vehicle speed, oil pressure, oil temperature, water temperature and fuel level. Aluminum door handles and trim pieces stretched across the dashboard. Overall the interior is a success, the supple leather, high-quality fit and finish is consistent with what you would expect to find on a top-of-the-line sports car. There was just one thing missing, cup holders. Neither example presented has this simple, yet handy option. The aluminum trim has breaks in two sections on the passenger side of the vehicle. As seen in the 997 and Panamera, I expected these to yield to my touch, exposing a concealed cup holder. However I was mistaken. Although this might not be as important as other optional features, the ability to have a bottle of water properly secured, not rolling around on the seat or floor, while on a spirited drive is useful and practical, at least to me.

Doubters continually question how much more innovation can be developed for a model that is now 47 years old, but Porsche seems to have done it yet again. They have adapted an age-old design with modern technology, performance and styling. The 991 might not be the rawest 911 ever made, but it certainly lives up to the hype.

3.8L Flat Six Cylinder Engine in the Porsche 911 (991) Carrera S

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At First Glance: All-New 2012 Porsche 911

23 Aug

By Matt McCarron

2012 Porsche 911: Courtesy Porsche North America

After months of partially disguised “spy” photos and unofficial press photos, it’s finally here. Today Porsche officially released the first details and photos of the their most revered vehicle, the 911. After nearly five decades of production the rear-engined Porsche 911 has become one of the most iconic and recognizable automobiles in the world.

Despite having subtle changes over the years the tradition of the 911 has remained largely unchanged. The 2012 911, designated the 991 internally, has stayed true to those roots. Although Porsche says the vehicle is “all-new”, many non-enthusiasts might claim the 991 looks nearly identical to its predecessor the 997. However, a closer look at the new 911 reveals many changes.

2012 Porsche 911: Courtesy Porsche North America

The wheelbase has increased by 3.9 inches, along with a lower height giving the 2012 911 a more aggressive overall appearance. The weight of the body has decreased by roughly 100 pounds thanks to lightweight aluminum-steel composite materials. The new 911 also has a wider front track, new rear axle and electro-mechanical power steering, resulting in greater driving agility, response and dynamics. On top of these features, the new Carrera S also offers Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC).

Another hallmark of the Porsche 911 is the high level of technology incorporated into each generation of the vehicle. The seventh generation is no different. According to Porsche the 991’s fuel consumption is up to 16 percent less than that of the 997. This improvement is made possible via a host of engine management systems, such as a start/stop function and electrical system recuperation. The seven-speed Porsche double-clutch (PDK) transmission also aids in the increased economy by letting the 911 “coast”. In addition to the PDK the 2012 911 will feature the worlds first seven-speed manual transmission.

Rear View: 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera: Courtesy Porsche North America

In terms of performance the new 911 offers more horsepower from a smaller displacement engine. The 2012 911 Carrera is powered by a 3.4-liter flat-six engine, compared with the 3.6-liter in the outgoing model. Regardless of this reduction the horsepower remains unaffected. The Carrera S model still has a 3.8-liter with 15 more horsepower, boosting peak output figures from 385 to 400 hp. These changes enable the 911 Carrera to accelerate from 0-60 mph in just 4.4 seconds (with PDK transmission). Meanwhile the Carrera S does the same sprint with the PDK in 4.1 seconds.

The 2012 Porsche 911 will make its world premiere at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show in September, and is scheduled to arrive in the U.S. beginning in February 2012.

Interior: 2012 911 with PDK transmission: Courtesy Porsche North America

© 2011 GermanAutoNews

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Any unauthorized reprint or use of any material is prohibited. No content information whatsoever may be reproduced or retransmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system without the express written consent of the creator of GermanAutoNews.com

Porsche Carrera 4 GTS unleashed

12 May

By Matt McCarron

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS coupe and cabriolet: Courtesy Porsche North America

The 997 model line of the Porsche 911 will be coming to an end this September at the Frankfurt Auto Show. However, that didn’t stop Porsche from adding one more version to their ever-expanding lineup of 22 different 911 models.

Porsche unveiled the 911 Carrera 4 GTS, adding a four-wheel-drive variant to the recently released Carrera GTS. The Carrera 4 GTS has an additional 23 hp over a standard Carrera 4S. This is made possible by internal changes to the 3.8-liter flat-six-cylinder engine including: a special resonance intake manifold with six vacuum-controlled tuning flaps and a sports exhaust system with four black tailpipes finished with polished, nano-coated inner shells.

This added horsepower enables the GTS to accelerate from 0-60 mph, 0.1 second quicker than the regular 4S. The optional PDK transmission and Sport Chrono Package Plus enables the GTS to accelerate from 0-60 mph in 4.0 seconds. The manual coupe GTS also and has an increased top speed of 187 mph (186 with PDK).

The exterior and interior accents are primarily black. The exterior is adorned with black side skirts from the 911 GT2, a black panel between the rear tailpipes and 19-inch RS Spyder design wheels, painted in high-gloss black. The interior is covered in black Alcantara on the center sections of the standard sport seats and on the rim of the three-spoke steering wheel and on the gear and handbrake levers.

The Carrera 4 GTS will go on sale starting in the fall.  The Carrera 4 GTS coupe will have a base MSRP of $110,200, with the Carrera 4 GTS cabriolet starting at a slightly higher base price of $120,100.

Carrera 4 GTS 3.8-liter flat-six-cylinder engine: Courtesy Porsche North America

© 2011 GermanAutoNews

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Any unauthorized reprint or use of any material is prohibited. No content information whatsoever may be reproduced or retransmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system without the express written consent of the creator of GermanAutoNews.com

Special edition vehicles, do they warrant the extra money?

25 Jan


By Matt McCarron

High-end auto manufacturers are always trying to get a leg-up over the competition. Manufacturers are constantly debuting updated or slightly tweaked versions of already existing vehicles or creating special editions of a particular model, creating a renewed interest and in-turn, new customers. But are these special editions really worth the inflated sticker price they command?

Case-in-point, the new Porsche 911 Black Edition. The special variant costs an additional $3,500 compared to a run-of-the-mill 911 Carrera coupe, and $2,500 over a Carrera Cabriolet. Surely you get some special or exclusive goodies for the extra money, but what are they, and do they give enough bang for the buck?

Porsche 911 Black Edition: Courtesy of Porsche North America

The 911 Black Edition exterior is painted in “Solid Black” and has other components matched to fit the exterior’s overall look, including black brake calipers, 19-inch 911 Turbo II wheels with a two-tone finish, and a “911” badge on the trunk lid. The interior features some special characteristics too, such as a limited edition plaque on the glove box and “Black Edition” stainless steel door entry guards, but other features are available to anyone ordering a regular 911 Carrera. These include a black interior with aluminum trim pieces and black instrument dials. The real section of the center console painted black and the car has Porsche Communication Management (PCM), a Sport Design steering wheel and a Bose surround sound system.

That might not seem like much. However, if you take the options that are offered on the Black Edition and ordered them individually it would cost approximately $8,390. That might be reason enough for someone to spend the $3,500, especially if an individual wanted to order a 911 similar to the Black edition. However, when it comes down to it, whether someone feels spending the extra money is warranted is up to the individual. Manufacturers will continue to produce limited special and run-out editions in an attempt to maximize profits.  Some like special editions and others don’t, but like the saying goes, “to each his/her own.”

© 2011 GermanAutoNews

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Any unauthorized reprint or use of any material is prohibited. No content information whatsoever may be reproduced or retransmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system without the express written consent of the creator of GermanAutoNews.com